Harvest-a-long: Finale!

Congrats, you’ve made it to the end of your cardigan! You’ve finished knitting it! Oh, blocking, you say? Yeah…that.

I have to admit, I’m rather bad at blocking things which are lace or socks. Lace is straight-forward – you use wires or pins and stretch it out until the straight lines all line up and your lace has “opened up” as much as you’d like. Socks, you just wet, throw them onto a blocking mat, and wait forever for them to dry.

This sweater, well, it’s a bit harder. If you’re yarn is not machine washable and dryable – like mine – you’ll want to block it by laying it flat on a level surface. I won’t go into the details though Tin Cat Knits offers advice on the pattern and you can Google it. Just know that blocking your sweater is important and, like ironing in sewing, gives you the best final product. Take your time. Don’t pull it up until it’s TOTALLY dry, no matter how tempted you may be to wear it ever-so-slightly damp.

Next time, I hope to share photos of my finished sweater and, in a few weeks, those of my friends and coworkers I somehow convinced to do this with me. For now, you can laugh at the photo I took just after I wore the ends in my sweater, on a train full of commuters from York to London.

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Harvest-a-long: Finale!

Harvest-a-long: Let’s get started

Hello, all, and welcome to the official start of the Harvest-a-long!

It’s currently noon (or will be, when this post actually shows up) here on the East Coast, so time to pick up your larger size needles and waste yarn (with your project yarn close at hand) and cast on.

(First, a bit of a confession. I started my sweater last Saturday in order to show you guys what each step will look like as you get to it. Those are the photos you’ll see here. In the spirit of the KAL, though, I will be starting on a mini version for Lizzie when ya’ll start at noon.)

The Collar

This pattern starts by doing a provisional cast-on then knitting a long and skinny garter-stitch piece to make the collar. While the pattern calls for a crochet provisional cast-on, I’ll be honest that I’ve never figured it out so I went with a basic knitted cast on. I was too excited to actually start cranking out the collar to show you a picture of that, of course.

At the end of the collar, you’ll place a marker in a designated spot, rotate 90 degrees, then pick up along that long side edge – the one with the two knit stitches next to each other.


Placing the marker near the edge

When you’re picking up your edge stitches, be sure to pay attention to the pick-up rate for your size. (In my case, this meant picking up three for every four stitches.) If you’re never knit a collar like this, don’t worry, it’s supposed to look sort of funny. Because you’re on a circular needle and have gone around a hard edge like that, you’re knitting will sort of curve.

After getting all of those edge stitches, you’ll unzip – but go slow! – your provisional cast-on and pick up those last loops. It’ll look something like this.


Lovely, bendy collar after all stitches are picked-up

Cranking Through the Increases

The last step before you start the increases it to, not surprisingly, put in four markers. These markers will let you cruise along without having to constantly count. Just remember, you’ll always knit to your first and after the last marker and increases are placed one stitch away from each increase marker. Also, I will not judge you if you have to write out the rows at this point, with wondering if you’re on the row where you have an extra increase along the button band edge.


Exciting action shot! Okay, not really, but it’s a photo I had.

Separating the Sleeves

You’ll need your waste yarn again, cut into a good foot-long length, just to be safe. When the pattern tells you to do so – you’ll also have a marker on either side of those stitches – you’ll carefully move the stitches from your needle onto that waste yarn.

I tend to move stitches over in pairs, so it’s pretty low risk if a stitch decides to jump off your knitting needle or the needle with the waste yarn.

My first sleeve, on the waste yarn (and before I tied the ends of the waste yarn together – really important!

Next, you’re going to cast on a given number of under-arm stitches. Trust me, no ones under-arm stitches look quite right for a few rows. I’ve tried just about every sort of cast-on and they always wind up sort of wonky.

Next time…increases for the front and the body!

(Want to share your project with me and other KAL participants? Mark your post with #harvestalong and #oneliferecorded. I’m hoping to share some of YOUR photos in a future post!)

Harvest-a-long: Let’s get started